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Office 365 – DTD is prohibited in this document issue

April 16, 2015 1 comment

 

 

 

 Office365logo       SP2013logo

Got trouble Connection PowerShell to SharePoint online? This could be the resolution to your troubles.
I had this myself, or we had it in our Company tenant. This is what the issue was and this is how I fixed it:

When trying to connect to PowerShell for SharePoint Online, using the Connect-SPOService command, we got a error that did not tell us anything.

PS dtd error 1

The error is:
Connect-SPOService : For security reasons DTD is prohibited in this document. To enable DTD processing set DtdProcessing property on XmlReaderSettings to Parse and pass the settings into XmlReader.Create method.

Well, its almost a joke right…
When searching the web for information on this particular, I struck zero…all I could find related to the ISP and the default search provider something. I quickly dismissed them as unrelated.
Then after some time had passed, I found a similar issue, this seemed related and it was a connectivity issue same as mine (If I still had the link I would give credit to where credit is due). This fellow had resolved the issue by adding a missing DNS record.
This made me think, since our tenant has existed since way Before Office 365 existed (BPOS) perheps we were also missing some of the required DNS records?
I checked with my collegues, and apparently we were missing the record as well.

So, if you ever see or get the ‘DTD prohibited’ issue, remember to check the DNS for the following record:

Type: CNAME
Alias: MSOID
Target: clientconfig.microsoftonline-p.net
Info: Used by Office 365 to direct authentication to the correct identity platform More Information

After I added this to DNS, Connect-SPOService works just fine!

SPO-Connect

 

Microsoft’s official explaination on the DNS record:
What’s the purpose of the additional Office 365 CNAME record?

When you run a client application that works with Office 365 such as Lync, Outlook, Windows PowerShell or Microsoft Azure Active Directory Sync tool, your credentials must be authenticated. Office 365 uses a CNAME record to point to the correct authentication endpoint for your location, which ensures rapid authentication response times.If this CNAME record is missing for your domain, these applications will use a default authentication endpoint in the United States, which means authentication might be slower. If this CNAME record isn’t configured properly, for example, if you have a typo in the Points to address, these applications won’t be able to authenticate.

If Office 365 manages your domain’s DNS records,, Office 365 sets up this CNAME record for you.

If you are managing DNS records for your domain at your DNS host, to create this record, you create this record yourself by following the instructions for your DNS host.

 

References and Credits
Nope, not this time…Credits & many thanks to To all of you.

_________________________________________________________

Enjoy!

Regards

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Loopback Check configuration Tool released – free download

December 12, 2013 1 comment

Win2012  logo  SharePoint2013Logo70x338

Hi All.

It is here! Free for all! DOWNLOAD

I am happy to announce that the Loopback Check Tool has finally been made available at Codeplex – https://loopbackchecktool.codeplex.com
No more last minute t-shooting the loopback check and ending up disabling it, trying to find the KB or a decent blog post on how to do it.

This Tool takes care of it all for you. Download the exe, put it on your servers, run it to configure the Loopback Check feature simple and easy.

Its simple.
Its small (21kb zipped)
Only click and make it happen
No installation, one single exe that works on most Windows Servers (and clients)
Disable the Loopback check completely (Not recommended)
Enable or Disable the Loopback Check function
Enable it and add excluded URLs (Recommended, now easy to do)

This is a preview image of what the tool looks like

Form

The tool works fine on:

Windows Server 2012
Windows Server 2012 R2
Windows Server 2008 R2
Windows Server 2008
Windows 7
Windows 8
Windows 8.1
And probably a few more…

References:

You receive error 401.1 when you browse a Web site that uses Integrated Authentication and is hosted on IIS 5.1 or a later version
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/896861/en-us

A quick guide to configuring the Loopback check
https://blog.blksthl.com/2013/05/07/a-quick-guide-to-configuring-the-loopback-check/

DisableLoopbackCheck & SharePoint: What every admin and developer should know.
http://www.harbar.net/archive/2009/07/02/disableloopbackcheck-amp-sharepoint-what-every-admin-and-developer-should-know.aspx

Thanks to:

Herakles and Gutke!

Win2012  logo  SharePoint2013Logo70x338

___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Enjoy!

Regards

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Create a bootable Windows Server 2012 R2 installation USB flash drive

October 18, 2013 19 comments

2012R2 logo

Hi Windows connoisseurs! (wiki)

(This is essentially a remake of my Create a bootable Windows 8.1 installation USB flash drive post.) The setps are the same so you can easily follow that post or use this slightly updated version.

In this guide I will help you find a way to install Windows Server 2012 R2 quick and easy, from a simple USB flash drive. It’s really easy, but you still need to Think about a few things.
I’ll list them here and if you want, you can follow the step by step guide below.

Quicksteps:

1. Get a USB Flash drive formatted with FAT32, it has to be AT LEAST 8GB! (The Windows Server 2012R2 installation bits will not fit on a 4GB USB drive…)
2. Download and install the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download tool from Microsoft Store here or Codeplex here  (It is an official Microsoft tool, totally wierdly named from the Windows 7 release but still very much valid!)
3. Download or locate a ‘Windows Server 2012 R2’ .iso file and store it locally on your harddrive.
4. Start the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download tool (from startbutton or ‘windows 8/Metro’ style startmenu’?)
5. Complete the steps 1-4
6. Insert the USB flash drive into the powered off PC to install, Power on and boot from USB drive (F9 at HP logo on HP Machines).
7. Install Windows Server as you would normally.
8. Done!

This guide in its entirety works just as well if you replace the Windows Server 2012 R2 .iso file with Windows 8.1, Windows 7, Windows Server 2012 or plain Windows 8 (Windows Server 2008 R2 not verified but willmost likely also work)

Step by step:

1. USB Flash Drive

Prepare a USB flash drive for installation, is has to be at least 8 GB in size and it has to be formatted with FAT32. It does not have to be erased, the tool will do that for you if needed.

USB

Before

2. Download and install the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download tool from Microsoft Store or Codeplex. The Links are as follows:

http://images2.store.microsoft.com/prod/clustera/framework/w7udt/1.0/en-us/Windows7-USB-DVD-tool.exe
or
http://wudt.codeplex.com

Run the .exe file, you will have to be a local administrator on your machine for it to install properly.

1

Click Next

2

Click Install

3

Click Finish

3. Locate a Windows Server 2012 R2 .iso file. This file should be placed on a local harddrive. It does not matter where you put it, as long as it is on a local HD and it is accessable to you when running the tool, meaning that you have access to where the file is stored in the filesystem.

4. After the installation of the tool has completed, you will suddenly notice this tile:

MetroIcon

You can also just use the search function, in ‘metro mode’ simply type Windows 7 and you will see it and its uninstall app.
Start the tool
Click Ok at the User Account Control popup dialog
The first screen should now look like this:

ChooseISO

5. Hit the Browse button to locate your Windows Server 2012 R2 installation iso file.

Step1

In my test, I’m using an .iso file downloaded from TechNet Subscriber downloads (soon to be no more)
It does not have to be from TechNet, it can be MSDN or Volume Licensing or really any form of Windows Server 2012 R2 installation iso.

Click ‘Next’

Step2ChooseMedia

Click on ‘USB device’
If you see the window below, that means that the USB drive is either not plugged in properly, or it has the wrong formatting or insufficient storage or similar. Make sure that you have a USB flash drive that meets: 4GB minimum+FAT32.

Step2ChooseMediaNoUSB

Insert a USB drive that meets the requirements and press the refresh button
Now, click on the ‘Begin copying’ button.

If the USB drive was ok, the copying will begin, but if not, if it still had files still on it, you will see this dialog:

Erase1

Click Erase to continue

Erase2

Click Yes and the formatting and copying process will begin.

Step4

Step42

Let it do its thing until it reaches 100%

When it has finished formatting and copying files, you are done.

USB

After!

6. Next step, is to insert the USB drive into the PC you want to install Windows Server 2012 R2 on, Power it off completely and Power on again.
Use BIOS settings to select ‘boot from USB’ or like on a HP machine, hit F9 at the HP logo screen to boot directly from USB.

7. Let the Installation begin! The Windows installation is pretty much standard. A Clean install is described here.  The setup of Windows 8, which is pretty much the same, is described here

8. Done!

References:

Install and Deploy Windows Server 2012 (R2)
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh831620.aspx

Thanks to:

Herakles and Gutke!

2012R2 logo

___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Enjoy!

Regards

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Create a bootable Windows 8.1 installation USB flash drive

October 8, 2013 14 comments

win8.1logo

Hi Windows Lovers!?

(Looking to install Windows Server? The same steps apply, but for a server specific guide, go here Create a bootable Windows Server 2012 R2 installation USB flash drive)

This time I’ll help you find a way to install Windows 8.1 quick and easy, from a simple USB flash drive. It’s a piece of cake really, but a few things you need to know about.
I’ll list them here and if you want, you can follow the step by step guide below.

Quicksteps:

1. Get a USB Flash drive formatted with FAT32, it has to be AT LEAST 4GB!
2. Download and install the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download tool from Microsoft Store HERE or Codeplex HERE  (It is an official Microsoft tool, totally wierdly named from the Windows 7 release but still very much valid!)
3. Download or locate a ‘Windows 8.1’ .iso file and store it locally on your harddrive.
4. Start the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download tool (from startbutton or ‘windows 8 style startmenu’?)
5. Complete the steps 1-4
6. Insert the USB flash drive into the powered off PC to install, Power on and boot from USB drive (F9 at HP logo on HP Machines).
7. Install Windows as you would normally.
8. Done!

This guide in its entirety works just as well if you replace the Windows 8.1 .iso file with Windows 7, Windows Server 2012 or plain Windows 8 (Windows Server 2008 R2 not verified but willmost likely also work)

Step by step:

1. USB Flash Drive

Prepare a USB flash drive for installation, is has to be at least 4 GB in size and it has to be formatted with FAT32. It does not have to be erased, the tool will do that for you if needed.

USB

Before

2. Download and install the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download tool from Microsoft Store or Codeplex. The Links are as follows:

http://images2.store.microsoft.com/prod/clustera/framework/w7udt/1.0/en-us/Windows7-USB-DVD-tool.exe
or
http://wudt.codeplex.com

Run the .exe file, you will have to be a local administrator on your machine for it to install properly.

1

Click Next

2

Click Install

3

Click Finish

3. Locate a Windows 8.1 .iso file. This file should be placed on a local harddrive. It does not matter where you put it, as long as it is on a local HD and it is accessable to you when running the tool, meaning that you have access to where the file is stored in the filesystem.

4. After the installation of the tool has completed, you will suddenly notice this tile:

MetroIcon

You can also just use the search function, in ‘metro mode’ simply type Windows 7 and you will see it and its uninstall app.
Start the tool
Click Ok at the User Account Control popup dialog
The first screen should now look like this:

ChooseISO

5. Hit the Browse button to locate your Windows 8.1 installation iso file.

ChooseISO2

In my test, I’m using an .iso file downloaded from TechNet Subscriber downloads (soon to be no more)
It does not have to be from TechNet, it can be MSDN or Volume Licensing or really any form of Windows 8.1 installation iso.

Click ‘Next’

Step2ChooseMedia

Click on ‘USB device’
If you see the window below, that means that the USB drive is either not plugged in properly, or it has the wrong formatting or insufficient storage or similar. Make sure that you have a USB flash drive that meets: 4GB minimum+FAT32.

Step2ChooseMediaNoUSB

Insert a USB drive that meets the requirements and press the refresh button
Now, click on the ‘Begin copying’ button.

If the USB drive was ok, the copying will begin, but if not, if it still had files still on it, you will see this dialog:

Erase1

Click Erase to continue

Erase2

Click Yes and the formatting and copying process will begin.

Step4

Step42

Let it do its thing until it reaches 100%

When it has finished formatting and copying files, you are done.

USB

After!

6. Next step, is to insert the USB drive into the PC you want to install Windows 8.1 on, Power it off completely and Power on again.
Use BIOS settings to select ‘boot from USB’ or like on a HP machine, hit F9 at tghe HP logo screen to boot directly from USB.

7. Let the Installation begin! The Windows installation is pretty much standard. A Clean install is described here.  The setup of Windows 8, which is the same, is described here

8. Done!

References:

Thanks to:

As Always, Mattias Gutke! At CAG for some strange reason….Always a friend, a great help and a second opinion!

GetItNow
___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Enjoy!

Regards

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Move your SharePoint IIS sites from the systemdrive(C:)

August 31, 2013 3 comments

Move your SharePoint IIS sites from the systemdrive(C:)
or avoid putting them there in the first Place.

Lionx

Do you see the lion that is totally in the wrong Place…or is it the Jeeps that are…?

Deal fellow SharePointlovers!

This time, I’ll try to show you how to avoid the messed up situation most SharePoint installations are in, with everything on the systemdrive, or C:
Now, us people have over time been better and better at one thing, we understand that the logfiles should not be located on the systemdrive, so we have learned over time to move the ULS log and the Usage and Health log from C:, some have even been clever enough to move even the IIS log from C:

But, what do we still always, always, always, find installed on C:?… … …yes, C:\inetpub!

It not very strange though, the developers of Windows Server have made a point out of not giving us an option to install inetpub on a different path, not unless you do an unattended installation or otherwise script or Control your installation. The ‘Add/Remove roles’ wizards in Server 2008, 2008R2 and 2012 all lack this option (for a reason).

BUT! This is intentially, the default inetpub location should and must be in the systemdrive, IIS is considered an operating system Component and has to be there for a number of reasons. At the end you will find a link to a KB article that explains this in more detail. Leave inetpub and its subfolders where it is!

So, why would we want to do this anyway
why move the inetpub and all of its content, or at least the separate site catalogs to a different drive?
– Separation (Performance and Security)
– Compartmentalization (Performance and Security)
Having averything on the same drive is bad for a few reasons, primarily performance and security. Perfomance since the OS is on the C drive and security because if an attacker by some means gets access to a different less secure applications sitecatalog, they also get access to the systemdrive and possible also all other webapplication sitecatalogs. Moving them to other drives, same or different, helps mitigate both possible issues.
I therefore recommend doing this:

Do your regular installation, add the Web Server role and let the inetpub folder end up on C:, like I said, no worries. Whats important for us will not be located there anyway.
Next, edit the registry to make the default location of inetpub be for example D: (unless this is were you will be putting all of your logfiles, then select a third or fourth drive)
Install the SharePoint as you would normally do, Central administration will now end up were you pointed the default location.
Create your Web Applications using the GUI or PowerShell and leave out the path, the IIS sites will be were you wanted them.

So, how do we do this in more detail? A Guide…

Configure the Web Server(s)

1. Configure the default location

On all of your web servers in the farm, and on your Central Administration server(s), edit the registry key that Controls the default location:

Start regedit by, Right clicking in the very lower left corner and you will get a list of actions, click on Run.

Reg1x

Type Regedit and click Ok.

Reg2x

Click Yes in the UAC dialog.

Reg3

In Registry Editor, we locate the following path: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\InetStp

Reg4x

Reg5x

Under ‘InetStp’ we have a number of keys.

Reg6x

Locate and Edit the key PathWWWRoot from the default: (%systemdrive%)

Regbeforex

to: (D: or where you prefer to locate it, E: F: G: H:…)

Regafterx

There you go! All set, no IIS reset or restarts of any kind required.
Like said before, go on and do this on all servers that will host a webserver (WFE or CA). If you don’t, then you will have an inconsistent setup making Everything very hard to setup and t-shoot.

2. Add SharePoint
After this has been changed on all of you r web servers, you can go ahead and install the SharePoint binaries and configure your farm, The Central Administration site will now be located on the drive you have specified, it will be in the exact same path as it normally would but on a different drive. For example: ‘D:\inetpub\wwwroot\wss\VirtualDirectories\20000\’

Note that the Central Administration UI will now be default suggest a different path:

NewWeb1x

If you create a new site using PowerShell, it will also by default put it in D: even if you don’t specify any path:

New-SPWebApplication -Name TheVeryFirst -ApplicationPool SharePoint -HostHeader theveryfirst.corp.balkestahl.se -Port 80 -Url theveryfirst.corp.balkestahl.se -DatabaseServer blksthl-sql -DatabaseName SP11_Content_TheVeryFirst

As you can see, were done! 🙂

Donex

For the logfiles, I’ll make a separate post, they should also be moved, more so even than the sitefolders. Logfiles will fill up the disks, they will slow performance and maybe most importantly, they contain delicate information that you want to keep separated from the OS and IIS.

References:

Guidance for relocation of IIS 7.0 and IIS 7.5 content directories
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2752331

Configure ULS log and Usage and Health log location
https://blog.blksthl.com/2013/06/05/configure-uls-log-and-usage-and-health-log-location/

Thanks to:

Mikael Nyström (The Deployment Bunny) – Truesec
Mattias Gutke – CAG


___________________________________________________________________________________________________

Good Luckl!!

Regards

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